Articles »

  • Wind energy by country: The top 10

    Posted 2019-03-28 15:40:41 by: Eke Eke

    The top 10 countries in the world by wind energy capacity. Jack UnWin - Power Technology. Wind energy is a well-established source of renewable energy, the wind speed data collected from some towns in Nigeria indicates that the country has good sites for the installation of wind energy conversion systems as it would be a way of boosting her energy needs, as well as accelerating the sluggish nature of the nation's rural electrification programmes. Hopefully in the near future wind energy will become a major source of energy in Nigeria, but what countries have the highest wind energy capacity in the world?   Wind power has become an important source of energy generation around the world, with global capacity reaching over 600GW in 2018. The construction of new wind power varies year to year and by region; Europe, for example, saw a  in wind capacity in 2018 compared with 2017. Wind energy by country: The top 10 But which countries have the highest capacity of wind energy? Power-technology.com looks at the top 10 countries by installed wind capacity in the world. 1. China – installed capacity 221GW China is the world leader in wind energy, with over a third of the world’s capacity. It boasts the world’s largest onshore windfarm in Gansu Province, which currently has a capacity of 7,965MW, five times larger than its nearest rival. The farm is currently only operating at 40% of its capacity, with a further 13,000MW to be installed leading to a grand total of 20,000MW (20GW) in 2020. This expansion is expected to cost $17.5bn. Despite its size, the Gansu turbines were described as looking “like scarecrows, idle and inert” by  due to low demand. 2. US – installed capacity 96.4GW The US is in second place with 96.4GW of installed capacity and is particularly strong in onshore wind power. Six of the largest 10 onshore windfarms are based in the US. These include the Alta Wind Energy Centre in ...

    Comments: 0   View more...

  • Tuteria - Technology for Education.

    Posted 2019-03-14 10:08:18 by: ENG Team

    He made a First Class. Then he decided to mass-produce quality education   Is it possible to use technology to transform education in Nigeria? Tuteria’s Godwin Benson believes it is. Source - Solomon Elusoji; www.qmarker.com  Benson Godwin - Founder Tuteria.   In May 2017, Tuteria, a platform that links students to nearby qualified tutors, won the UK Royal Academy of Engineering’s top prize for African innovators. It beat others ideas such as “a system that reduces the amount of energy to heat water, an app that controls water consumption and a smart jacket to identify pneumonia”, to clinch the $32,000 attached to the prize, the BBC reported at the time. The competition’s head judge and a British business executive, Malcolm Brinded, described Tuteria as an idea that “will go on to change the lives of millions of people who are eager to learn and develop new skills.” At the centre of the triumph was an unassuming Nigerian engineer, Godwin Benson. Benson, 29, a First Class graduate of Systems Engineering from the University of Lagos, told me recently that winning the engineering prize was a “turning point” for Tuteria, which he co-founded with a friend in 2015. The startup had already received awards from startup programs organized by Microsoft, Facebook and the Tony Elumelu Foundation. In 2016, Benson met Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg in Lagos, who later acknowledged Tuteria is unleashing “economic development opportunities” across Africa. But at the point of entering for the engineering prize, revenues had plateaued. “Before the Africa Prize, we were doing quite well,” Benson told me. We had met, for the first time, at a fast food restaurant close to the company’s Lagos headquarters. The engineering prize, however, provided more exposure for the young founders. “It wasn’t just about winning the money, there was a lot of protracted training. ...

    Comments: 0   View more...

  • A Nigerian Engineer’s Eventual Triumph.

    Posted 2019-03-12 10:26:57 by: ENG Team

    A Nigerian Engineer’s Eventual Triumph. When Dr. Dele Sanni ran out funds for his innovative machine, he felt deeply frustrated. Then, an opportunity presented itself. Source - Solomon Elusoji; www.qmarker.com Professor Dele Sanni; 3-D-3-P Industrial Dryer. Finalist, African Prize for Engineering Innovation 2019  When Dele Sanni starts talking about his now acclaimed invention, he can go on and on, taking on the voice of the patient teacher eager to help his student understand another of life’s inexplicable mysteries. Sanni is sturdy, round and laughs with ease. He is an Associate Professor at the Department of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering at the Obafemi Awolowo University, where he has lectured for virtually his entire academic career. “I have been here for quite a while,” he told me during our first conversation. Last November, Sanni’s drying machine invention (he has a patent for it) earned him a place on the 2019 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation long-list. The APEI is the brainchild of the UK’s Royal Academy of Engineers and, since 2014, has recognized and rewarded the African creators of groundbreaking technologies developed to solve acute challenges across the continent. The winner of the Prize, which will be announced in May, goes home with £25,000. This year, four Nigerians, including Sanni, are on the long-list of 17 African innovators. “Our lives depend on others. We don’t have control over our lives. And this is the unfortunate situation.”Illustration by Nonso Brendan for The Question Marker “I wasn’t expecting it,” he said, during a phone conversation, allowing himself some laughter. His machine, the 3d-3p rotary dryer, is a 30ft long, 10ft high and 8ft wide behemoth. But Sanni told me that, compared to similar dryers in the market, his is more portable, consumes less power, more efficient and ...

    Comments: 0   View more...